Iguazu falls Argentina

Getting to the other side of Iguazu falls

Getting from Foz do Iguacu to Puerto Iguazu on the Argentinian side could be a problem. At least, it would be time consuming trying to do it by yourself. That’s why we decided to go for a tour. The site on the Argentinian side is huge, with around 9km of walking if you want to see as much as possible. Therefore you need all the time you can get. We got picked up in the morning from our hostel and left Brazil.

Triple frontier

First we got to go to a viewing point on the Argentinian side to see Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay being split by a river. All countries cities close to the border.

Paraguay has Ciudad del este
Argentina has Puerto Iguazu
Brazil has Foz do Iguacu

Standing in Argentina, Paraguay to the left of the river and Brazil to the right!
Standing in Argentina, Paraguay to the left of the river and Brazil to the right!
A big fountain is to be found on the Argentinian side
A big fountain is to be found on the Argentinian side

Entrance passes

The tour guide got our entrance passes quickly and we went in. Then we heard it was gonna be a 9km walk around the park. Nadin, Verena and me brought only flip-flops (why we’re called the flip-flop gang). Yeeeah. Looked forward a lot for this. Already had issues with blisters from before because of the flippin flops.

Climbing animal
Climbing bandit
The curly thing growing is a parasite killing trees
The curly thing growing is a parasite killing trees

Lucky having a small group this day

The guide was very patient. We where around 10 people in the group and someone was always slow. But this meant I could walk very comfortably with my flip-flops and thus avoided blisters. Talked to him and usually the group is two or three times bigger. Now that wouldn’t be too fun.

Water flowing towards the falls
Water flowing towards the falls

Different perspectives

Many nice viewing sites all around from a different perspective than the Brazilian side. My two personal favorites would be the Devils eye on first place and the bridge just under a fall. Going on the bridge will make you soaking wet but it’s totally worth it if you ask me. I have a video from here that I’ll post in the future. Devils eye offers something totally unique. More about it further down.

The bridge getting you very close to the falls
The bridge getting you very close to the falls

After eating lunch and being happy that I could use my limited Spanish it was time for us to head up to the Devils den. To get there, you have to go on a small cute little train for 10 minutes maybe. Then you have a 15-20min walk over the river. It’s so crazily dimensioned. Over a kilometer walking on a bridge with water flowing under you.

Huge river
Huge river

Devils eye in Argentina

I’ll let the pictures explain how awesome the Devils eye is. It’s not enough though, you better get your ass here as quickly as possible.

My sunglasses are soaking after all the mist
My sunglasses are soaking after all the mist

Don’t really know if this place is particularly adapted for people with disabilities but they seemed to have some offroad wheel chairs.

Offroad wheel chairs
Offroad wheel chairs

Pictures from the air

Iguazu falls from airplane
Iguazu falls from airplane
Iguacu falls from airplane
Iguacu falls from airplane

Interested in the Brazilian side?

Next Stop: Ciudad del Este!